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About The Authors
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Rick Ash, PhD, received a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Illinois, a PhD in biological sciences from Stanford University, and completed postdoctoral training at the University of California at San Diego. He joined the Neurobiology and Anatomy Department at the University of Utah School of Medicine in 1980, and has directed research on membrane biology for the past three decades. Dr. Ash currently serves as Histology Director. He was awarded the University Distinguished Teaching Award.

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David A. Morton, PhD, received a bachelor's degree in zoology from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and completed his graduate degrees in human anatomy at the University of Utah School of Medicine. He currently serves as Anatomy Director. He was awarded the Early Career Teaching Award, the Preclinical Teaching Award, and the Certificate of Recognition for distinguished and exemplary service to students with disabilities. Dr. Morton is an adjunct professor in the Physical Therapy Department and the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. He also serves as a visiting professor at Kwame Nukwame University of Science and Technology in Kumasi, Ghana.

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Sheryl A. Scott, PhD, received a bachelor's degree in zoology from Duke University, a PhD in biology (neurobiology) from Yale University, and pursued postdoctoral training at McMaster University Medical Center in Hamilton, Ontario, and at Carnegie Institution of Washington in Baltimore, Maryland. She has directed a research program funded by the National Institutes of Health studying neural development for nearly 30 years, first at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York, and more recently at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Dr. Scott is currently Director of Graduate Studies and Associate Chair of the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy. She teaches medical histology along with Drs. Ash and Morton.

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